• Home
  • Chinese Economists Society 2019 North America Conference

Chinese Economists Society 2019 North America Conference

Below is some helpful information regarding the upcoming North American Conference of the Chinese Economists Society (CES), which is being hosted by the University of Kansas' Department of Economics.

 

CONFERENCE DATES: April 6-7, 2019

CONFERENCE PROGRAM (click for pdf)

 TITLES & ABSTRACTS (click for pdf)

REGISTRATION

April 5  at 2pm at the DoubleTree Hilton Hotel. Registration will stay open throughout the conference on site.

CONFERENCE VENUE

Wescoe Hall, University of Kansas.

LODGING INFORMATION

Double Tree by Hilton Hotel Lawrence, 200 McDonald Drive, Lawrence, Kansas, 66044, +1 (785) 841-7077

TRANSPORTATION FROM THE AIRPORT

Lawrence, Kansas is about 50 minutes from the Kansas City Airport (MCI) via Shuttle Transportation (about $85 to $95 one-way). Schedule and booking of the shuttles are available on several websites:

  1. KCIBATS: http://kcibats.com/college.php (Tel: (913) 634-5484 or (913) 575-3185 or E-mail: reservations@kcibats.com).
  2. GTI Taxi: http://www.gtslawrence.com/ (Tel: (785 842-8294 or 1-888-467-3729).
  3. Arrival Shuttle: https://arivalshuttle.com/.
  4. SDM Transportation: reservation@sdmtransportation.com or 785-979-2428

CONFERENCE TRANSPORTATION

A shuttle bus from the hotel to the KU campus (and vice versa) will be provided.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Inquiries should be sent to:



  • Professor Slusky discusses surprise out-of-network ambulance bills on The Takeaway. Listen >>
  • Professor Slusky was named a Research Fellow of IZA—the Institute of Labor Economics in Bonn, Germany. View profile >>
  • Graduate students present at MEA's 83rd annual meeting. Learn more >>
  • KU Today features Professor Sabarwal's research. Read article >>
  • Professor Ginther's research points to early career pubications as the likely source of racial gap in NIH funding. Learn more >>
  • Professor Barnett's work on accurately measuring money cited as critical in avoiding past Fed mistakes. Read Forbes' article >>